Human papilloma virus vaccine

Lingering infection with high-risk HPV types, such as types 16, 18, 31, and 45, can favor the development of cancer.

Human papilloma virus vaccine

HPV stands for human papilloma virus. HPVs are a group of more than related viruses. HPVs are called papillomaviruses because some of the HPV types cause warts or papillomas, which are non-cancerous tumors. But some types of HPV are known for causing cancer. HPV causes most cases Human papilloma virus vaccine cervical cancer, as well as many vaginal, vulvar, anal, penile, and oropharyngeal cancers cancers of the throat and tongue.

The papilloma viruses are attracted to and are able to live only in certain cells in the body called squamous epithelial cells. These cells are found on the surface of the skin and on moist surfaces called mucosal surfaces like: These are common warts. These can infect the moist surface layers that line organs and cavities of the body that open to the outside, like those listed above.

The mucosal HPV types are also called genital or anogenital type HPVs because they often affect the anal and genital area. Can a vaccine help prevent HPV? Vaccines are available to help prevent infection by certain types of HPV and some of the cancers linked to those types.

Other HPV vaccines are available outside the U. Gardasil 9 helps prevent infection by 4 types of HPV 16, 18, 6 and 11plus 5 other high risk types: Who should be vaccinated against HPV and when? HPV vaccine produces the strongest immune response in preteens. To work best, the HPV vaccines should be given at age 11 or The vaccines are given in a series of shots.

The vaccination series can be started as early as age 9. HPV vaccination is also recommended for females 13 to 26 years old and for males 13 to 21 years old who have not started the vaccines, or who have started but not completed the series. Males 22 to 26 years old may also be vaccinated.

Why should the vaccines be given to pre-teens? The vaccines work best at this age. Research shows that younger people have a better immune response to the vaccine than those in their late teens and early 20s.

And, the vaccines will prevent the covered types of HPV only if they are given before exposure to the virus. This is also an age when other vaccinations are given, and when children are likely to still be getting regular medical check-ups. What about men and women older than 26?

Should they get one of the vaccines? The Gardasil 9 vaccine is approved for women and men up to age 45, though not recommended after age While the vaccine is safe, it is unlikely to provide much, if any, benefit as people get older. Talk to your health care provider for more information.

Who should not get one of the HPV vaccines or who should wait? Pregnant women should not get any HPV vaccine at this time, even though they appear to be safe for both mother and the unborn baby. Women who started a vaccine series before they learned they were pregnant should complete the series after the pregnancy.

Make sure the health care provider knows about any severe allergies. The following should not get an HPV vaccine: Anyone with a severe allergy to latex should not get the Cervarix vaccine.HPV vaccines are available for females and males to protect against the types of HPV (human papillomavirus) that most commonly cause health problems.

. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of more than related viruses that can cause several cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer.

Learn more about how HPV is transmitted, the different types of HPV, HPV vaccines, and HPV treatment. Human papillomavirus is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Most sexually active men and women being exposed to the virus at some point during their lifetime.

HPV stands for human papilloma virus. HPVs are a group of more than related viruses. Each HPV virus in the group is given a number, and is called an HPV type (for instance, HPV).

HPVs are called papillomaviruses because some of the HPV types cause warts or papillomas, which are non-cancerous.

Human papilloma virus vaccine

HPV vaccine is important because it protects against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is a very common virus; nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected in the United States. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a very common virus; nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected in the United States.

Learn how you can protect the children in your life from this cancer-causing virus.

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